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peak training

Peak Training – Reach Peak Performance

Feel the power of peak training

 

Have you ever dreamt of that illusive feeling of effortlessly moving at high speed? Your legs moving up and down like well-oiled pistons. Your heart beat methodical and rhythmical like that of a grandfather clock. And each breath, a forceful controlled locomotive-like stream of power.

Athletes, coaches and sports scientist continually strive to unearth the mystical components necessary for peak performance. Peaking is the ultimate goal of a cyclist’s training plan. Nothing beats a day, week, or month where you’re one with your bike. You’re so physically strong that you often question whether your chain is on.

Peaking is an integral part to a competitive cyclist’s annual training plan. Every period of training preceding the peaking phase should have been sequenced with the intent to maximize physiological and psychological readiness for this stage. No stone should have been left unturned!

 

Tapering: An essential component of the peaking process

Peaking is often associated with tapering. Tapering is nothing more than shedding fatigue. It’s a form of stress reduction that leads to positive enhancements.

Too effectively peak a cyclist must undergo a phase of base training and a phase of competition. Tapering seeks to manipulate the fundamental training variables, volume, frequency and intensity. Volume is typically reduced while frequency of workouts is maintained. Periodically, intensity will increase depending on the type of cycling involved. Peaking is still very much an art.

Soar to the highest peak

Tapering must dissipate accumulated fatigue from your everyday training. Not only must a taper reduce the fatigue it must maintain specific fitness. In order to reach peak performance a cyclist must have a desirable amount of fitness that coincides with positive physical and psychological alterations. A cyclist should feel rejuvenated, energetic and have a reduced perception of effort.

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